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The Surprisingly Dangerous Mistake Nearly Every Teacher Makes

We’ve all heard the script for teaching persuasive writing: first, you start with your opinion, or thesis (usually “Schools should allow cell phones!” or something else that the students want to argue). Then, you come up with three or so reasons to support your opinion. Last, you add examples or evidence to support your reasons. Nearly every humanities teacher
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Thanks to my addiction to Google analytics, I now know that the search term “teach students to write faster” brings several people to this blog every day. (Google doesn’t seem to mind that I’ve never actually written on this topic before.) Since so many people seem to be concerned about this topic, I thought that
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When someone is new to teaching creative writing, you’ll often hear them say things like this: “I want my students to be free in their writing.” “I don’t want to limit them.” “I want them to express themselves creatively, without rules or constraints.” These are all admirable goals from great new teachers–and I said all
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